Sunflowers Save Lives During Nuclear Meltdowns

Grace Higgins | January 10th, 2020

A field of sunflowers is not only a beautiful thing to look at, but it can also save lives. Scientists and biologists are working together in nuclear disaster zones such as Chernobyl, Fukushima, and Hiroshima to ensure sunflowers are being planted in mass in these soils. The key is because these plants soak up toxic metals from the soil and the water.

minutemediacdn.com

Tourism into nuclear meltdown zones and new TV series dramatizing the disasters, such as HBO TV series Chernobyl about the 1986 nuclear disaster has spurned a popular interest in how life goes on in these regions. People always seem to have a fascination with places that have been abandoned, and what many do not know, is that sunflowers play a key role when it comes to cleaning up the aftermath.

Sunflowers become an essential step in ensuring the areas of this nuclear disaster could one day be radiation free. This is because these types of flowers have shown the remarkable ability to be able to soak up toxins from the ground, even from local waters.

And not only are they bright and colorful, but sunflowers also increase the quality of air and help speed up the process of making drinking water clean again. This is one reason why sunflowers have become an icon of hope when it comes to seeing a world free of nuclear weapons, with many groups now using the sunflower as a symbol of peace. Scientists refer to them as hyperaccumulators, which basically means that the plants can soak up toxicity at an amazing speed.

Like all plants sunflowers find their nutrients to live from the ground, but they seem to also soak up the bad stuff with the good stuff, it seems they are not picky eaters. Research has shown pollution has dropped by 40% in regions that planted rows of sunflowers, governments naturally took action to plant as many as possible.

This is because planting sunflowers is much cheaper than having to dig up all of the radiation heavy soil. The tragedy, of course, can not be undone, and the planted sunflowers also serve as a reminder that we take the required steps to ensure nuclear disasters become an issue of the past.

Next Article
  • Sally Ride First American Women In Space

    On June 18, 1983, NASA Astronaut Sally Ride became the first American woman to enter space. She launched with her four crewmates on the Shuttle Challenger, on mission STS-7. The ride had been selected with five other women to be part of NASA’s space program back in 1978. With the advances of the space shuttles...

    Read More
  • Reindeer In A WW2 Submarine

    One of the more unusual moments of World War II was when a British submarine transported around a reindeer it had been given by the Russians as a gift. In 1941, the crew of the HMS Trident was given a reindeer by the USSR navy. The reindeer then spent the next 6 weeks living with...

    Read More
  • Archduke Franz Ferdinand Killed Over 300,000 Animals While Hunting

    Over one hundred years ago, the heir to the Astro Hungarian throne was a crazy guy called Franz. Well Archduke Franz Ferdinand to be exact, his assassination led to the turn of events that caused the start of World War I. Pulling in the Russian Empire, Germany, France, Italy, China, and the U.S. into one...

    Read More
  • The Legend Of Snake Rock In Naka Cave

    Naka Cave is found in Phu Langka National Park in Thailand, and in Thai it means snake. There is a real reason for this, the cave looks like a giant snake. The texture of the stones appears to resemble the scaled skin of a snake. Over the years there have been hundreds of articles publishing...

    Read More
  • Wife Carrying Is An Extreme Sport In Finland

    Over fifty men happily sling their wives or partners over their shoulders and run off into the race. An hour-long gruel through the Finnish town of Sonkajarvi and thousands of fans will be cheering them on. This is the extreme sport of wife-carrying in Finland. The World Wife Carrying Championships is now well into its...

    Read More
  • Aeschylus The Ancient Writer Killed By A Falling Tortoise

    Aeschylus is often regarded as the creator of the tragic genre. He is one of the early Greek writers whose plays have survived into the modern era, the other two being Sophocles and Euripides. Arguably, he is also the founder of serious Greek drama. Mostly we find that he added many more characters into his...

    Read More
  • For Europeans Hershey’s Chocolate Tastes Like Vomit

    If you ask any American they may tell you that Hershey’s is the chocolate to buy. But, if you ever offer one to a European then you may find they grimace at the thought. That is because, for anyone used to eating European chocolates, Hershey’s will taste like vomit. It is kind of like a...

    Read More