Amazing Cave Art from Mona Island

 | Grace Higgins
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In recent news, archaeologists just recently explored the caves of Mona Island and found some pretty exciting things.  When the caves were studied in more narrow tunnels, researchers then discovered thousands of well-to-do paintings.  The investigators even dated these paintings back before the Europeans arrived on Mona Island.  How amazing would it be to discover something like that?  Keep in mind that Mona Island is the third largest island in the Puerto Rican archipelago.  

What makes this type of artwork so unusual is the fact that some of the art had been rubbed into the walls.  Various other forms of the painting had been constructed with mixtures of local paint materials, as well charcoal.  Researchers used carbon and X-Rays to determine that some of the artwork was five-hundred years old, while other artforms were much older.  Over the centuries, keep in mind that thousands of rubbings, as well paintings finally covered the walls and even the ceilings of the Mona Island caves.  Investigators also revealed that charcoal speleothems, which are mineral deposits had formed from the limestone cave’s chemical connections.  

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These interactions had networked with groundwater, which formed throughout the many tunnels.  A fantastic feature that some of the researchers discovered was with carbon dating techniques.  They used these methods on the calcite secretions which covered some of the artwork.  It was established or highly speculated that the Taino people of Mona Island must have returned throughout the thirteenth or fifteenth centuries, adding more various forms of art to the caves.  While many types of the artwork remain a complete mystery, there have been other cultural records that could have been destroyed by the Spanish.  How interesting is that?  It appears the whole world is nothing more than a mystery anymore.  

A lot of the artwork was planned to portray the lifestyle on the Mona Island.  There were feather headdresses and so much more.  Another fantastic element to take into consideration is that the Taino people profoundly believed that the moon and sun arose from the ground up.  This belief made them travel very deep into the caves, working by torchlight.  The Taino people were very spiritual when it came to their artwork and how they constructed each piece.  The more significant mystery is in fact, how did these people know to draw such exciting and descriptive paintings?  Could these people have had connections with a power or force higher than ourselves?  Could they have been in communication with UFO’s or the paranormal to know how to paint such well-to-do paintings?  We can only speculate what it truly meant.